Omakase

The Japanese habit of omakase (お任せ) when you’re ordering at a restaurant pretty much means, “I’ll leave it up to you”, inviting the chef to be innovative and surprising in the selection of dishes. I try to apply the idea to everything in my daily life.

Omakase (お任せ)

I found out about the Japanese habit of omakase (お任せ) when I was visiting the country in 2016. You’d use it when you’re ordering at a restaurant pretty much means, “I’ll leave it up to you”, inviting the chef to be surprising and innovative in the selection of dishes. A quick check for #omakase on Instagram only made me realise how widespread (and how amazingly tasty) the habit is. It felt like the best summary of how I’d like to travel – open to all different experiences, looking to make memories by getting out of your comfortzone, by doing things I’ve never done before. I try to apply the idea behind to everything between how I plan my holidays, how I pick my runs, how I pick my food, how I explore cities and how I travel in general.

Omakase every day

Applying Omakase in your life

If you apply this, you experience more. You are more likely to stumble upon an amazing part of the city that wasn’t mentioned in the Lonely Planet. You are more likely to meet new people, to have the staff in your restaurant pick your food or to have a hipster local point you to the best possible bars and restaurants.

Or to be more specific: You are more likely to end up drinking tea with Bedouins in the desert, to do the haka with Maori in New Zealand, end up bar crawling with people you never met in Tokyo, sharing life stories with drunk Russian millionaires in London and my other amazing travel memories.

Not convinced? I wrote a post on how I balance risk versus rewards when traveling with an open mind: dealing with the unknown – this might help.

Haka practice in Auckland, New Zealand
With Ammarin Bedouin Awad and Faris on the Jordan Trail
Omakase in Kanteki in Tanabe in Japan

All my posts on omakase

Avocado toast at One Shot Fortuny in Madrid

On being unprepared

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Tokyo robot restaurant

Stories

The value of travel isn’t so much in scratching off a list of destinations, of…

Jordan Trail - tea with Faris

An introduction to omakase – traveling without expectations

I travel a lot. A lot a lot. Mostly for business. Frequently for some amazing hike somewhere around the world or while spending time with my family. But the red thread through my travel is omakase – the art of letting go of expectations. I strongly believe that if you travel with an open mind, when you leave your expectations at home, you experience more. That is the thinking behind this blog, omakas.es.