If you search on Google, there are more people who have written posts, updates, tweets or other messages on “What if I had …” than there are people who wrote “What if I hadn’t …”. Saying yes is the gateway to an adventure.

Saying “yes” is the gateway to an adventure – to the potential of a memorable experience. It might turn into one of your most memorable moments ever. Saying “no” is taking away any chance that will happen.

I still regret the time I didn’t walk with the youth national soccer teams into the huge stadium in Gothenburg.

Saying “yes” and omakase

It is one of the basics behind omakase-traveling and this blog. The Japanese habit of omakase (お任せ) when you’re ordering at a restaurant pretty much means, “I’ll leave it up to you”, inviting the chef to be innovative and surprising in the selection of dishes. It is an unconditional trust in the chef that he will do his very best – an unconditional “yes” to his food.

Saying yes to a Bedouin, yelling from a valley, turned into a remarkable friendship. It is how I ended up DJ-ing in a bar in Siena and knowing I wanted to marry my wife. Doing the haka in the middle of a bar in Auckland with the team from Maori TV. How I ended up at a braai in Johannesburg. Eating chicken feat in Hong Kong. Bar crawling with people I had never met before in Tokyo.

Saying “yes” is the gateway to an adventure.

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